Posts tagged ‘PF’

PF Manifesto 2011 Zambia

Please click PF 2011 Manifesto Zambia to see the full version as a pdf-file.

Patrotic Front (from the Original document)

2011 – 2016 Manifesto

This document is the property of the Patriotic Front and shall not be reproduced or printed without the express authority of the Party. Produced by the Office of the Secretary General and approved by the Central Committee of the Party

FOREWORD

Zambia will be celebrating 47 years of independence as the country goes to the polls in 2011, but with very little to show to its citizens in the areas of social and economic development. The economy of Zambia has continued to slide into the abyss whilst the country’s resources have continued to be mismanaged and misapplied by the MMD government. The MMD government has shown many a time that it is not accountable to the people of Zambia. The constitutional making process through the National Constitutional Conference (NCC) on which the MMD government spent a colossal sum of over K135 billion, the sale of the Zambia Telecommunications Company (Zamtel) and the repeal of the abuse of office provision in the Anti-Corruption Act in 2010, were processes opposed by the people of Zambia but which were undertaken by a government acting with impunity and contempt towards its citizens. Once again the dream by the Zambian people to enact a legitimate constitution has been betrayed by the regime in power. We cannot continue to witness the deliberate and systematic destruction of our country at this rate. The country needs a new leadership which shall provide a new vision to take the reins of government and thence redeem its citizens from vices such as corruption, abuse of public resources, tribalism, nepotism and unaccountability to citizens. The education and health sectors as well as the poor provision of employment opportunities – key components of any nation’s human development index -have continued to perform poorly in Zambia. In fact, the recent 2010 edition of the Human Development Index ranks Zambia’s negative performance at number 150 out of 169 countries. The MMD government has been boasting of economic growth but this is due purely to a copper boom on the international market which is driving up our “paper” GDP. None of this economic growth is reaching the people in the villages and townships – it is not pro-poor growth such as PF will aim to create. Access to quality education and health care for the majority of our people has remained only a pipedream while the elite continue to promote their predatory social and economic habits at the expense of the majority. Fellow Zambians, only an irresponsible government can continue to be oblivious and turn a blind eye to such social and economic inequities amongst its citizens. The human dignity of a country lies in its citizens irrespective of their station in life. To guarantee human rights in the constitution without the promotion of human dignity of individual citizens is not only a meaningless exercise but also a mockery to them. Our people are in need of food, shelter, access to clean water, health care facilities, a sustainable environment, social justice and employment. To keep itself in power the MMD government has over the years worked very hard to centralize control in its own hands. This applies to the separation of powers in the classical sense. But it has also deliberately continued to weaken the power base of our traditional rulers and hence exclude them from direct government administration. The MMD government has refused to implement the decentralization of government administration which would incorporate both elected local leaders and traditional rulers in the governance of the country. The gender policy has been a complete failure as women have continued to be marginalized or excluded from the mainstream decision making organs. Despite Zambia having been declared a Christian nation under the constitution the MMD government has continued to antagonize the church and marginalize it in matters of governance and national development with the civil society suffering the same fate against all democratic principles known to any civilized society in the 21st century. No country can attain its social and economic development goals without the active participation of the youth. However, the youth in Zambia have yet to play their positive role as a result of the MMD government’s inability to formulate and implement policies which would promote youth empowerment in business or guarantee educational opportunities. Unemployment figures amongst the youth have continued to rise. This is irrespective of the levels of academic qualifications obtained as employment opportunities are nonexistent. For those who attain admission to institutions of higher learning they are subjected to prohibitive tuition fees leading to constant withdrawals from their programmes in colleges and universities. The Patriotic Front in government shall seek to address and remedy the foregoing failures using locally driven social and economic initiatives through the empowerment of Zambians while recognizing the important role the donor community plays in complementing these initiatives. We shall seek to promote an inclusive government and open our doors to all stakeholders in running the affairs of state. The fight against corruption shall be driven by independent institutions of government in collaboration with an independent judiciary which commands the respect and confidence of our citizens. Social justice shall form the core of the PF government in its domestic and foreign policy. We, therefore, wish to consummate this social contract with you the citizens of Zambia when you turn out in numbers in 2011 to vote for the Patriotic Front and say “Yes, a better Zambia for all!”

Michael Chilufya Sata
Party President

Table of Contents
Foreword … 4
Core Programmes … 7
1. EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT … 7
2. HEALTHSERVICES … 10
3. AGRICULTURE DEVELOPMENT … 12
4. LOCAL GOVERNMENT AND HOUSING DEVELOPMENT … 19
Social Sectors … 21
5. SOCIAL PROTECTION … 22
6. PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES INSTITUTIONAL REFORMS … 24
7. SOCIAL SECURITY REFORMS … 24
8. WOMEN IN SOCIO- ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND GENDER … 24
9. YOUTHS IN SOCIO-ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT … 25
10. ARTS AND CULTURE DEVELOPMENT … 25
11. SPORTS AND RECREATION DEVELOPMENT … 26
Economic Sectors … 28
12. INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT … 28
13. TOURISM DEVELOPMENT … 29
14. LANDSDEVELOPMENT … 31
15. ENVIRONMENT AND NATURAL RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT … 32
16. LABOUR AND INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS REFORMS … 33
17. FINANCE AND NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT PLANNING … 33
18. ENERGYDEVELOPMENT … 37
19. MINES AND MINERALS DEVELOPMENT … 39
20. COMMERCE, TRADE AND INDUSTRY DEVELOPMENT … 40
21. SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT … 41
Governance and the Administration of the State … 42
22. LEGAL AND CONSTITUTIONAL REFORMS … 42
23. ELECTORAL REFORMS … 42
24. GOOD GOVERNANCE AND PUBLIC SERVICE REFORMS … 43
25. JUDICIAL INSTITUTIONAL REFORMS … 47
26. THE CHURCH AND CIVIL SOCIETY IN NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT … 48
27. MEDIA REFORMS … 49
28. INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND COOPERATION … 50

August 20, 2011 at 14:04 3 comments

PF Manifesto 2007 Zambia

To see the full version of the document, please click PF Manifesto 2007 Zambia to open a pdf-file.

PATRIOTIC FRONT (from the Original document)

MANIFESTO

(PF Logo)

RESTORATION OF HUMAN DIGNITY THROUGH SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT BASED ON OBSERVANCE OF HUMAN RIGHTS AND RULE OF LAW

PATRIOTIC FRONT FOR LOW TAXES

LOCAL AND FOREIGN INVESTMENT AND EMPLOYMENT CREATION

FOR MORE MONEY IN POCKETS OF INDIVIDUALS AND FAMILIES AND BETTER LIVES FOR ALL

VOTE FOR PATRIOTIC FRONT

TABLE OF CONTENTS

ZAMBIA: THE BACKGROUND … 1
FOREWORD BY THE PRESIDENT … 3
1. LEGAL AND CONSTITUTIONAL REFORMS … 5
2. CABINET … 6
3. HOME AFFAIRS … 6
3.1 THE POLICE SERVICE … 6
3.1.1 HOUSING … 6
3.1.2 TRAINING … 7
3.1.3 CONDITIONS OF SERVICE … 7
3.2 IMMIGRATION … 7
3.2.1 POLICY … 7
3.2.2 CONDITIONS OF SERVICE, TRAINING AND HOUSING FOR IMMIGRATION OFFICERS AND OTHER CIVIL SERVANTS … 8
3.3 NATIONAL REGISTRATION … 8
3.3.1 POLICY … 8
3.4. THE DRUG ENFORCEMENT COMMISSION AND ANTI-CORRUPTION COMMISSION … 8
4. CORRECTIONAL SERVICES (PRISON SERVICES) … 8
4.1 REFORM AND REHABILITATION OF INMATES … 9
4.2 CORRECTIONAL OFFICERS (PRISON OFFICERS) … 9
4.2.1 TRAINING … 9
4.2.2 HOUSING … 9
4.2.3 CONDITIONS OF SERVICE … 10
5. EDUCATION … 10
5.1 PRIMARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION … 10
5.1.1 CONDITIONS OF SERVICE OF TEACHERS … 11
5.2 PRIVATE AND GRANT-AIDED EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS … 12
5.3 TERTIARY EDUCATION … 12
5.4 UNIVERSITIES … 13
6. LOCAL GOVERNMENT … 14
6.2 MUNICIPAL AND CITY COUNCILS … 15
6.3 RURAL COUNCILS … 15
6.3.1 THE ROLE OF TRADITIONAL AUTHORITIES … 17
6.4 PROVISION OF SERVICES … 17
6.4.1 HOUSING DEVELOPMENT … 17
6.5 PARTICIPATION IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT … 18
7. AGRICULTURE AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT … 18
7.1 AGRICULTURAL MARKETING … 19
7.2 NATIONAL FOOD SECURITY … 20
8. COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND SOCIAL WELFARE … 20
8.1 COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND SOCIAL WELFARE … 20
8.2 EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION … 21
9. ENERGY AND WATER DEVELOPMENT … 21
10. LAND … 23
11. MINES AND MINERALS DEVELOPMENT … 24
11.1 MINING, COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL IMPACTS … 26
12. FINANCE … 27
12.1 FINANCE AND PLANNING … 27
12.2 TAXATION … 27
12.2.1 BROADENING OF THE TAX BASE … 28
12.3 BUDGET … 28
13. COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY … 28
14. SOCIAL SECURITY … 29
15. DEFENCE AND SECURITY … 30
16. AFFIRMATIVE ACTION … 30
16.1 GENDER POLICY … 30
16.2 YOUTH POLICY … 32
16.3 POLICY ON THE DIFFERENTLY – CHALLENGED … 32
17. THE MEDIA … 33
18. TOURISM AND WILD LIFE PROTECTION AREAS … 34
19. ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND NATURAL RESOURCES … 36
19.1 WATER … 37
19.2 FISHERIES … 37
20. HEALTH POLICY … 38
20.1 CONDITIONS OF STAFF OF MEDICAL PERSONNEL … 39
21. COMMUNICATION AND TRANSPORT … 40
21.1 POSTAL SERVICES … 40
21.2 INFORMATION COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY … 40
21.3 TRANSPORT … 41
21.3.1 RAILWAY TRANSPORT … 41
21.3.2 ROAD NETWORK … 42
21.3.2.1 ROAD SAFETY MEASURES … 42
21.3.3 AIR TRANSPORT … 42
21.3.4 WATER TRANSPORT … 42
22. INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS … 43
23. LABOUR … 44
24. SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY … 44
25. THE ARTS, SPORTS AND RECREATION … 46

ZAMBIA: THE BACKGROUND

Zambia is a landlocked country covering an area of 752,612 square kilometres (about 2.5% of Africa). It shares borders with the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and Tanzania to the north, Malawi and Mozambique to the east, Zimbabwe and Botswana to the south, Namibia to the southwest, and Angola to the west. Administratively, the country is divided into nine provinces and 72 districts. Of the nine provinces, two are predominantly urban – Lusaka and the Copperbelt. The remaining provinces – Central, Eastern, Luapula, Northern, North Western, Southern and Western – are predominantly rural. The country is situated on the great plateau of south central Africa. Its vegetation is mainly savannah woodlands and grassland. The country has a pleasant sub – tropical climate with three distinct seasons: the cool and dry season, the hot and dry season, and the hot and wet season. The country is well endowed with natural resources. It has five main rivers: the Zambezi, Kafue, Luangwa, Luapula, and Chambeshi. In addition, the country also has the lakes Tanganyika, Mweru, Mweru Wa Ntipa, Bangweulu, and the manmade lakes Kariba and Itezhi-tezhi. Other interesting features include the Victoria Falls on the Zambezi river bordering Zimbabwe. Prior to independence on October 24, 1964, Zambia was known as Northern Rhodesia. In the late nineteenth century, various parts of what was to become Northern Rhodesia were administered by the British South Africa Company. In 1924, the British Colonial Office assumed responsibility for administering the territory. In 1953, Northern Rhodesia joined the Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland which was dissolved in 1963. British colonial rule was characterised by a general neglect of the needs and aspirations of the population. After attaining independence, the first Zambian government found itself with considerable financial resources at its disposal, largely derived from copper mining. The government embarked on a major programme of developing the social, physical and economic infrastructure of the country. Education was made compulsory and health services were provided free of charge. Zambia’s economy consists of a modern urban-oriented sector and a rural agricultural sector. For many years, the modern sector had been dominated by parastatal organisations, while private businesses predominated in the construction and agricultural sectors. Since 1991, with the introduction of a liberalised market-oriented economy, most parastatals have been privatised and, in some cases, liquidated. Copper mining is still the country’s main economic activity, accounting for 95% of export earnings and contributing 45% of government revenue during the decade following the attainment of political independence (1965-1975). In the mid-1970s, following a sharp decline in copper prices and a sharp increase in oil prices, the country’s economy started to deteriorate. Attempts were made to minimise dependency on copper exports by diversifying the economy through the creation of import substitution parastatals. This effort did not achieve the desired results. Despite being abundantly endowed with natural resources, Zambia has undergone traumatic experiences in its economic life over the last twenty years. This has resulted in a number of policy experiments meant to lift the country from its economic quagmire. One of these policy experiments, as the economy reached stagnation, was the Structural Adjustment Programme (SAP) which was initiated in the 1980s. The SAP, however, failed to alter the economy structurally and exacerbated poverty among the majority of Zambians. Currently, around 80% of Zambians are classified as poor. Poverty is more prevalent in rural areas compared to urban areas (83% and 56%, respectively). In the 1990s and the early part of this century, other attempts at economic resuscitation were attempted. In 1991, the new Government launched an Economic Recovery Programme (ERP) aimed at reversing the protracted decline in the economy by stimulating sustained positive growth, improved living standards, and quality of life. In 2001, the government initiated the development and implementation of a broad-based Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP) aimed at reducing poverty and improving living conditions of the people. Unfortunately all efforts to revive the economy have at best resulted only in cosmetic changes. To date, all human development indicators – per capita, income, life expectancy, infant mortality, literacy, etc. – reveal a bleak picture for the country’s future, making the prospect of achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGS) a daunting, if not impossible task. Whilst realizing the enormity of the problems facing our country, the PF remains undaunted in its determination to turn the situation around for the people of Zambia. To this end, the PF intends to usher in dramatic changes that will radically transform this country into a model for the rest of the African continent to emulate. This manifesto represents the future of Zambia as we project it under a PF government.

2006 PATRIOTIC FRONT MANIFESTO

FOREWORD BY THE PRESIDENT

The 2006 elections give us an opportunity to make right all that went wrong before the 2001 elections and indeed all that has since gone wrong since the fraudulent 2001 elections, which produced a government with a with a highly questionable mandate. He has since imposed himself on our people and our state institutions, but without any regard for the views, suffering and plight of our people. The MMD regime has ignored and rejected the need to address all the important issues that have required serious attention since the 2001 elections. Calls for a new Republican Constitution that reflects the will of the people, and which could stand the test of time, being enacted before the 2006 elections, for example, have fallen on a deaf Republican President. The MMD regime has thrived on nepotism. All the key positions in state institutions have been filled with relatives and friends, and without any regard to their abilities and capacities to serve the people of Zambia efficiently. Our fragile, but promising economy has also been mismanaged through the wilful mismanagement of the exchange rate, imposition of punitive and exploitative taxes, and failure to provide critical essential infrastructure and services. As a result, poverty has become entrenched and endemic among our people, especially among those without access to jobs and essential infrastructure and service, both in urban and rural areas. Individuals and our struggling industries are also inconvenienced on a daily basis by poor management of the energy sector, which has resulted in constant, but unpredictable load shedding and the ever recurring, but crippling shortages of petroleum products, as well as loss of jobs. As a result, the much sought after jobs by our people have been sacrificed, so that MMD regime could claim some dubious and illusory economic achievement in the name of a meaningless strong Kwacha. The main beneficiaries of the MMD regime, apart from relatives and friends, are mostly foreigners. Those who have put themselves at the service of a regime, whose leaders seem to have no conscience, because they have not been moved by the plight and suffering of the Zambian workers, who have been reduced to daily casual employees in their own land, while foreign firms and consultants feast on their sweat and diminishing natural resources. Fellow countrymen and women, we can put all the evils and suffering we have experienced under the MMD regime to an end. We have an opportunity to free ourselves from misrule, humiliation and abuse by an incompetent regime. The Patriotic Front has listened to the cries of the least among us. It is for this reason that we refused to walk away from the challenge of providing leadership to our people. We have been resolute and steadfast. We cannot walk away when our country is bleeding, for lack of care and leadership, when our people are crying out, for one of their own to lead them and speak out for them. The good lord has been gracious too. He has protected us from all evil and enabled us to survive unimaginable humiliation and harassment. God has given us the strength to offer ourselves to our people, so that we can be of service to them. In this manifesto, fellow countrymen and women, you will find our diagnosis and solutions to the challenges that face our country today. Among the challenges is the need to restore human dignity, to place respect of human rights at the fore of all our policies and programmes. We have, therefore, developed policies and programmes designed to restore human dignity through employment creation and provision of essential infrastructure and services. Give us the mandate to preside over the affairs of our country. We shall deal with its problems squarely and with due diligence. We shall not waste a second on fruitless vengeance, as has been the custom. For us, vengeance is for God. We are ready to serve our people and our country with diligence and zeal. We shall reduce taxes to resuscitate our economy, manage the exchange rate responsibly and with employment creation and growing our economy in mind. Our economic policies will create jobs and allow individuals and families to rebuild their lives and dignity. My fellow citizens, we can create a new social order in our land. Zambians can again have a future to look forward to. We can have a new country in which people look out and support one another. Give us your vote, and we shall change Zambia for the better. We have a competent team to manage the affairs of our country. Our candidates in the elections will be selected by the local people in all the wards and constituencies throughout Zambia. Our season of service is nigh and we look forward to being of service to you all.

Michael C. Sata
PRESIDENT

March 10, 2011 at 16:17 Leave a comment


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This blog is about countries of the Southern African Development Community (SADC) regarding societies, political parties and policies. Most interest will be spent on the countries: Botswana, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa and Zambia.

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