Posts tagged ‘2007’

ULP Manifesto 2007 Zambia

To see the full version of the document, please click ULP 2007 Manifesto Zambia to open a pdf-file.

MANIFESTO 2007

United Liberal Party (ULP)

ZAMBIA THE COUNTRY FOR ALL

Zambia, situated in Southern Africa, is a land-locked country covering 752,612 square kilometres with a population of about 10 million people. Zambia is the third most urbanized country in Africa, with almost 50% Zambians living in urban areas, especially along the line of rail. Zambia is a potentially rich country with abundant natural resources such as land, water, minerals, forests and their biodiversity. Although it has 42 million hectares of arable land, only 6% is cropped annually, mostly under rain-fed agriculture. Rain-fed agriculture comes under severe threat during drought periods. Zambia has a mixed economy consisting of a modern urban-oriented sector confined to the line of rail, and a rural agricultural sector. After attaining political independence in 1964, Zambia was classified as a middle income country and one of the richest countries in Africa. From that time, state-run conglomerates called parastatals dominated the economic sector. Copper mining, the country’s symbol of economic wealth, contributing 95% of export earnings and 45% of government revenue during the decade after political independence, came under severe pressure as world copper prices fell in the mid 1970s. From a production of 713,000 metric tonnes in 1976 to about 300,000 tonnes in 1996, Zambia’s copper mines have continued to register losses and dwindling contribution to the country’s gross domestic product. Since the 1990s, the shrinking mining sector and widespread closures of most industries have compounded the problem of unemployment. Current data indicate that the majority of Zambians in both urban and rural areas are not in formal employment, with only 29% of women living in urban areas working in the formal sector. The shrinking job market, inflation, and the corresponding erosion of real earnings have reduced the capacity of most households to afford basic needs. Poverty and hunger now characterise most households — with per capita incomes of less than US$20. More than 80% of the Zambian population lives in abject poverty and squalor. In addition, Gini coefficients depict that 60% of the country’s income is enjoyed by less than 10% of the population, while 40% of the income is shared by more than 90% of the population.

LOST AND SQUANDERED OPPORTUNITIES FOR DEVELOPMENT

The ULP ascertains with great concern that in the period that the MMD has been in power, our country has been brought into economic chaos and the population is in despair. Political gimmicks and the MMD’s ulterior interests have compromised economic reforms by promoting policies that are inadequate to the national character. The incompetence, dilettantism, the absence and the incoherence of the current government decisions, vis-à-vis the prognosis set up by the ULP specialists, lead us to the conclusion that the achievement of Zambia’s economic straightening is impossible if the MMD government is maintained in power. It is time to recognise that the failure of governing must be stopped immediately if Zambia is to have another chance for economic and social recovery. The successive budgets under the MMD government have not been budgets of austerity, as they claim, but budgets of despair and trickery. Under these circumstances, the ULP finds it absolutely necessary to urgently apply a programme of reconstruction that is aimed at stopping the continued economic decline, create a favourable and stimulative economic background, remake the credibility of our country abroad and, above all, promote real reforms with bearable pace and social costs to the whole population. In this context, the agreements with international bodies must be negotiated and concluded with professionalism, for the benefit of our people so as to allow, concurrently, access to foreign financing, economic recovery, protection of national output, and gradual diminishing of the harsh social costs of the economic reforms. The ULP recognizes that the support of the people is essential if the objectives of our reforms are to be attained. Treating contemptuously the needs of the citizens, ignoring them, changing the reforms into a dogma that must be applied at any cost, even at the expense of life, can create big social discontents and dangers to democracy. In Zambia today, there is too much tension and hatred which cannot be cured by the stick of the police or by tear gas, neither can these ills be cured by diversions nor attempts to compromise and blackmail political opponents. Zambia’s socio-economic and political crises will be worse if we do not replace this confrontation with dialogue, and the dictates of the strong with consensus. Open-ended liberalisation and poor application of market reforms have shifted Zambia from a producer nation to a consumer and supermarket economy. Manufacturing, Mining and Agriculture have collapsed rendering Zambia’s competitive participation in the regional and international economic blocs meaningless. The decade of the MMD in government thus constitutes a lost and squandered opportunities, a scenario that should be frowned upon by the Zambian people. That is why the year 2006 is a crucial year for the future of the Zambian economy and society. Our country can be a victim of chaos and violence if those who lead Zambia will not succeed to stop the collapse of the economy and the deteriorating living standards of the population. We will not succeed to solve social conflicts peacefully if we negate dialogue and negotiation. The MMD government has no solutions at all for this country, at the economic, social and political levels. The ULP, therefore, offers the Zambian people, not only new ideas, a new course, and a new President, but also the promise of opportunity, the dignity of work, and a decent life for all. We will act decisively and ask to be held accountable if we fail to deliver on our promises.

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March 30, 2011 at 16:23 Leave a comment

UDA Manifesto 2007 Zambia

To see the full document, please click UDA 2007 Manifesto Zambia to open a pdf-file.

UNITED DEMOCRATIC ALLIANCE  (from the Original document)

UDA Manifesto – Lusaka 2006

1.0 OUR NATION DESERVES BETTER

1.1 ZAMBIA’S REAL Alternative

The United Democratic Alliance (UDA) promises to provide our beloved nation with an accountable leadership that is dynamic, effective, competent and free of corruption. A leadership that will promote national unity and reconciliation and that seeks to bind all our people in the common purpose of eliminating the scourge of perpetual poverty. This will be done in an environment where probity and transparency become watchwords in the management of public affairs. Zambia is in a deep socio-economic crisis. Our children lack decent education, unemployment is at an all time high, disease ravages the nation and more than 80% of the populace cannot meet their daily nutritional requirements. In the midst of such adversity we have no option but to pool our resources and reserves aid tackle the problems that challenge us with single-minded purpose and resolute determination. The UDA is well aware that government alone cannot overcome the myriad problems that afflict our nation but it can provide an environment conducive to the public/private partnership that is imperative if we are to succeed. Therefore to create a climate of confidence in which all sectors of the community feel at liberty to forge anew and promising future is one of our greatest challenges. There is no doubt, unity is strength and to this end the FDD, UNIP and the UPND have chosen to shed their differences in favour of a movement that will inculcate a renewed sense of national purpose and provide the launch-pad from which to reverse our dismal fortunes and create a new country free of poverty where merit is the sole criterion of performance.

1.2 The Vision

The UDA’s Vision is:

To create a united, poverty free, prosperous and non-discriminatory Zambia where the people are in charge of their own development and destiny. This is necessary to deliver on our promise of good governance; to place the political leadership firmly at the service of the people; to fully observe the separation of powers so vital to the checks and balances essential to the protection of our fundamental human rights; to guard against discrimination on grounds of race, gender, religion or ethnicity; to bring joy back into the lives of our people as we face the new dawn with confidence and hope. On a continent famous for famine, violence and disorder we will show the world that we have the courage, fortitude arid political will to make the choices required to lift us out of despair; and to shine a light that will be a beacon of hope that welcomes all men and women of goodwill to join us in our march towards peace and prosperity.

1.3     The Mission

To provide a credible, dependable, respectable and respectful leadership that instils a sense of pride in our people by:

1) Letting the people govern through decentralisation of power in favour of the district and traditional leaderships.

2) Creating and diversifying the economy in which our nationals are the principal players and beneficiaries while reaching out for skills and capital, ever mindful that the common good of the nation should be the prime consideration.

3) Fostering and nurturing of our dependable extended family system in the: sure knowledge that a healthy, happy family is the rock upon which we construct a healthy, happy country

4) Implementing an unshakeable commitment to the universal rights of man where human and property rights are considered sacrosanct and inviolable.

5) Dedicating ourselves to integrity, probity, transparency and accountability in the management of government.

6) Glorifying God Almighty our Creator through respect for life from inception

1.4     The Strategy

At the root of poverty and other problems afflicting Zambia are: over-centralization of government functions, exclusion of our nationals from the main economic activities, corruption and the sheer incompetence in management of national affairs. In the management of public affairs, fewer and fewer officials make decisions, which affect millions of the people. They also expend public funds with no or little reference to the people. Today, Zambia is Lusaka and Lusaka is Zambia. All this is buttressed by sheer incompetence of those charged with managing government affairs. In addition while liberalization has opened up opportunities for individual enterprise, most Zambians are excluded from the mainstream economic activities by consigning them to pretty trading. Therefore, while we acknowledge in no uncertain terms that our development is stifled by lack of capital and skills and we welcome those who would join with us in overcoming those shortcomings we are emphatic that all joint endeavours must be sensitive to our desperate need to improve the of life of our people through stimulating our moribund economy that urgently needs to become dynamic and expansive. Further, due to the curse of corruption the felonies of the few wreak misery on the majority as public officials use their positions for little more than self-aggrandisement at the expense of the people. Consequently, the term ‘civil-servant’ has become a joke. So pervasive is this conduct that it has become a corrosive culture, a virus that is killing our country and as with any potentially terminal disease, drastic intervention is required.

The UDA plans to overcome these problems by:

1. Devolving both economic and political power to the districts.

2. Creating institutions to provide both technical financial support to empower Zambians so that they become principal players and beneficiaries in their own economy and well positioned equal players in the world economy.

3. Recognising the effective role of traditional leaders in development and the role of cultures in the context of a young democracy that is sensitive to our history and values.

4. Sustaining the growth of the economy through making Zambia a safe and attractive destination for capital, skills and commercial endeavour.

5. (Through decentralisation), concentrating our resources on providing quality social services a means to improve the quality of life of our people.

6. Putting Zambia proudly on the podium of the international stage as a country that stands firmly and fearlessly for freedom, democracy and the rights of man.

1.5 UDA the Real Deal

Consistent with many African governments the MMD has allowed its promise of the so-called New Deal, to drift into a conveniently forgotten oblivion leaving the majority of our people worse off than ever before. Where there was consensus now there is confrontation; power for its own sake has become an end in itself and there is a pervasive indifference to the suffering of the majority. Despite a proclaimed commitment to rooting out corruption the facts show that the MMD has done no more than pay lip-service to the problem and the culprits continue to lord their wealth over the victims with impunity. Under MMD Government prosecution of corruption has become selective because only corrupt practices from which MMD or its leadership does not benefit is prosecuted.

To give our nation a fresh start and usher in a new dawn the UDA will:

i) Within 90 days pass the Constituent Assembly Act paving the way for a new constitution which will lead to a national referendum on its acceptance. This will be through a Contract with the People and it will embrace all the principles and guiding rules we need to forge ahead in a prosperous union

ii) Within 30 days implement the Independent Broadcasting Act freeing the airwaves and opening up the country to constructive, vibrant debate that will educate, entertain and enlighten.

iii) Within 30 days turn ZNBC into a public broadcaster.

iv) Within 60 days introduce a Repent and Restitution Commission which will invite all those guilty of graft, plunder and other forms of abuse of office to come forward, confess, repent, return ill-gotten gains and at the pleasure of the presiding commissioners escape further punitive action. The same offer will be open to members of the private sector who have prospered unfairly through bribery, corruption and related crimes. Those who spurn this offer will do so at their dire peril and face the law rath of the law to be enforced by a rejuvenated Anti-Corruption Commission.

v) Within 90 days pass the Freedom of Information Act allowing the public full unfettered voice unconstrained by a secrecy obsessed leadership that hides its sins behind a blanket of undeserved executive privilege. In the new era Zambians will be free to give full vent to their opinions within the bounds of common decency and an aversion to bearing false witness.

vi) Within 30 days repeal the Pub1ic Order Act to enable Zambians to freely assemble without harassment from State Agents.

March 20, 2011 at 16:21 Leave a comment

PF Manifesto 2007 Zambia

To see the full version of the document, please click PF Manifesto 2007 Zambia to open a pdf-file.

PATRIOTIC FRONT (from the Original document)

MANIFESTO

(PF Logo)

RESTORATION OF HUMAN DIGNITY THROUGH SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT BASED ON OBSERVANCE OF HUMAN RIGHTS AND RULE OF LAW

PATRIOTIC FRONT FOR LOW TAXES

LOCAL AND FOREIGN INVESTMENT AND EMPLOYMENT CREATION

FOR MORE MONEY IN POCKETS OF INDIVIDUALS AND FAMILIES AND BETTER LIVES FOR ALL

VOTE FOR PATRIOTIC FRONT

TABLE OF CONTENTS

ZAMBIA: THE BACKGROUND … 1
FOREWORD BY THE PRESIDENT … 3
1. LEGAL AND CONSTITUTIONAL REFORMS … 5
2. CABINET … 6
3. HOME AFFAIRS … 6
3.1 THE POLICE SERVICE … 6
3.1.1 HOUSING … 6
3.1.2 TRAINING … 7
3.1.3 CONDITIONS OF SERVICE … 7
3.2 IMMIGRATION … 7
3.2.1 POLICY … 7
3.2.2 CONDITIONS OF SERVICE, TRAINING AND HOUSING FOR IMMIGRATION OFFICERS AND OTHER CIVIL SERVANTS … 8
3.3 NATIONAL REGISTRATION … 8
3.3.1 POLICY … 8
3.4. THE DRUG ENFORCEMENT COMMISSION AND ANTI-CORRUPTION COMMISSION … 8
4. CORRECTIONAL SERVICES (PRISON SERVICES) … 8
4.1 REFORM AND REHABILITATION OF INMATES … 9
4.2 CORRECTIONAL OFFICERS (PRISON OFFICERS) … 9
4.2.1 TRAINING … 9
4.2.2 HOUSING … 9
4.2.3 CONDITIONS OF SERVICE … 10
5. EDUCATION … 10
5.1 PRIMARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION … 10
5.1.1 CONDITIONS OF SERVICE OF TEACHERS … 11
5.2 PRIVATE AND GRANT-AIDED EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS … 12
5.3 TERTIARY EDUCATION … 12
5.4 UNIVERSITIES … 13
6. LOCAL GOVERNMENT … 14
6.2 MUNICIPAL AND CITY COUNCILS … 15
6.3 RURAL COUNCILS … 15
6.3.1 THE ROLE OF TRADITIONAL AUTHORITIES … 17
6.4 PROVISION OF SERVICES … 17
6.4.1 HOUSING DEVELOPMENT … 17
6.5 PARTICIPATION IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT … 18
7. AGRICULTURE AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT … 18
7.1 AGRICULTURAL MARKETING … 19
7.2 NATIONAL FOOD SECURITY … 20
8. COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND SOCIAL WELFARE … 20
8.1 COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND SOCIAL WELFARE … 20
8.2 EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION … 21
9. ENERGY AND WATER DEVELOPMENT … 21
10. LAND … 23
11. MINES AND MINERALS DEVELOPMENT … 24
11.1 MINING, COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL IMPACTS … 26
12. FINANCE … 27
12.1 FINANCE AND PLANNING … 27
12.2 TAXATION … 27
12.2.1 BROADENING OF THE TAX BASE … 28
12.3 BUDGET … 28
13. COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY … 28
14. SOCIAL SECURITY … 29
15. DEFENCE AND SECURITY … 30
16. AFFIRMATIVE ACTION … 30
16.1 GENDER POLICY … 30
16.2 YOUTH POLICY … 32
16.3 POLICY ON THE DIFFERENTLY – CHALLENGED … 32
17. THE MEDIA … 33
18. TOURISM AND WILD LIFE PROTECTION AREAS … 34
19. ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND NATURAL RESOURCES … 36
19.1 WATER … 37
19.2 FISHERIES … 37
20. HEALTH POLICY … 38
20.1 CONDITIONS OF STAFF OF MEDICAL PERSONNEL … 39
21. COMMUNICATION AND TRANSPORT … 40
21.1 POSTAL SERVICES … 40
21.2 INFORMATION COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY … 40
21.3 TRANSPORT … 41
21.3.1 RAILWAY TRANSPORT … 41
21.3.2 ROAD NETWORK … 42
21.3.2.1 ROAD SAFETY MEASURES … 42
21.3.3 AIR TRANSPORT … 42
21.3.4 WATER TRANSPORT … 42
22. INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS … 43
23. LABOUR … 44
24. SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY … 44
25. THE ARTS, SPORTS AND RECREATION … 46

ZAMBIA: THE BACKGROUND

Zambia is a landlocked country covering an area of 752,612 square kilometres (about 2.5% of Africa). It shares borders with the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and Tanzania to the north, Malawi and Mozambique to the east, Zimbabwe and Botswana to the south, Namibia to the southwest, and Angola to the west. Administratively, the country is divided into nine provinces and 72 districts. Of the nine provinces, two are predominantly urban – Lusaka and the Copperbelt. The remaining provinces – Central, Eastern, Luapula, Northern, North Western, Southern and Western – are predominantly rural. The country is situated on the great plateau of south central Africa. Its vegetation is mainly savannah woodlands and grassland. The country has a pleasant sub – tropical climate with three distinct seasons: the cool and dry season, the hot and dry season, and the hot and wet season. The country is well endowed with natural resources. It has five main rivers: the Zambezi, Kafue, Luangwa, Luapula, and Chambeshi. In addition, the country also has the lakes Tanganyika, Mweru, Mweru Wa Ntipa, Bangweulu, and the manmade lakes Kariba and Itezhi-tezhi. Other interesting features include the Victoria Falls on the Zambezi river bordering Zimbabwe. Prior to independence on October 24, 1964, Zambia was known as Northern Rhodesia. In the late nineteenth century, various parts of what was to become Northern Rhodesia were administered by the British South Africa Company. In 1924, the British Colonial Office assumed responsibility for administering the territory. In 1953, Northern Rhodesia joined the Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland which was dissolved in 1963. British colonial rule was characterised by a general neglect of the needs and aspirations of the population. After attaining independence, the first Zambian government found itself with considerable financial resources at its disposal, largely derived from copper mining. The government embarked on a major programme of developing the social, physical and economic infrastructure of the country. Education was made compulsory and health services were provided free of charge. Zambia’s economy consists of a modern urban-oriented sector and a rural agricultural sector. For many years, the modern sector had been dominated by parastatal organisations, while private businesses predominated in the construction and agricultural sectors. Since 1991, with the introduction of a liberalised market-oriented economy, most parastatals have been privatised and, in some cases, liquidated. Copper mining is still the country’s main economic activity, accounting for 95% of export earnings and contributing 45% of government revenue during the decade following the attainment of political independence (1965-1975). In the mid-1970s, following a sharp decline in copper prices and a sharp increase in oil prices, the country’s economy started to deteriorate. Attempts were made to minimise dependency on copper exports by diversifying the economy through the creation of import substitution parastatals. This effort did not achieve the desired results. Despite being abundantly endowed with natural resources, Zambia has undergone traumatic experiences in its economic life over the last twenty years. This has resulted in a number of policy experiments meant to lift the country from its economic quagmire. One of these policy experiments, as the economy reached stagnation, was the Structural Adjustment Programme (SAP) which was initiated in the 1980s. The SAP, however, failed to alter the economy structurally and exacerbated poverty among the majority of Zambians. Currently, around 80% of Zambians are classified as poor. Poverty is more prevalent in rural areas compared to urban areas (83% and 56%, respectively). In the 1990s and the early part of this century, other attempts at economic resuscitation were attempted. In 1991, the new Government launched an Economic Recovery Programme (ERP) aimed at reversing the protracted decline in the economy by stimulating sustained positive growth, improved living standards, and quality of life. In 2001, the government initiated the development and implementation of a broad-based Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP) aimed at reducing poverty and improving living conditions of the people. Unfortunately all efforts to revive the economy have at best resulted only in cosmetic changes. To date, all human development indicators – per capita, income, life expectancy, infant mortality, literacy, etc. – reveal a bleak picture for the country’s future, making the prospect of achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGS) a daunting, if not impossible task. Whilst realizing the enormity of the problems facing our country, the PF remains undaunted in its determination to turn the situation around for the people of Zambia. To this end, the PF intends to usher in dramatic changes that will radically transform this country into a model for the rest of the African continent to emulate. This manifesto represents the future of Zambia as we project it under a PF government.

2006 PATRIOTIC FRONT MANIFESTO

FOREWORD BY THE PRESIDENT

The 2006 elections give us an opportunity to make right all that went wrong before the 2001 elections and indeed all that has since gone wrong since the fraudulent 2001 elections, which produced a government with a with a highly questionable mandate. He has since imposed himself on our people and our state institutions, but without any regard for the views, suffering and plight of our people. The MMD regime has ignored and rejected the need to address all the important issues that have required serious attention since the 2001 elections. Calls for a new Republican Constitution that reflects the will of the people, and which could stand the test of time, being enacted before the 2006 elections, for example, have fallen on a deaf Republican President. The MMD regime has thrived on nepotism. All the key positions in state institutions have been filled with relatives and friends, and without any regard to their abilities and capacities to serve the people of Zambia efficiently. Our fragile, but promising economy has also been mismanaged through the wilful mismanagement of the exchange rate, imposition of punitive and exploitative taxes, and failure to provide critical essential infrastructure and services. As a result, poverty has become entrenched and endemic among our people, especially among those without access to jobs and essential infrastructure and service, both in urban and rural areas. Individuals and our struggling industries are also inconvenienced on a daily basis by poor management of the energy sector, which has resulted in constant, but unpredictable load shedding and the ever recurring, but crippling shortages of petroleum products, as well as loss of jobs. As a result, the much sought after jobs by our people have been sacrificed, so that MMD regime could claim some dubious and illusory economic achievement in the name of a meaningless strong Kwacha. The main beneficiaries of the MMD regime, apart from relatives and friends, are mostly foreigners. Those who have put themselves at the service of a regime, whose leaders seem to have no conscience, because they have not been moved by the plight and suffering of the Zambian workers, who have been reduced to daily casual employees in their own land, while foreign firms and consultants feast on their sweat and diminishing natural resources. Fellow countrymen and women, we can put all the evils and suffering we have experienced under the MMD regime to an end. We have an opportunity to free ourselves from misrule, humiliation and abuse by an incompetent regime. The Patriotic Front has listened to the cries of the least among us. It is for this reason that we refused to walk away from the challenge of providing leadership to our people. We have been resolute and steadfast. We cannot walk away when our country is bleeding, for lack of care and leadership, when our people are crying out, for one of their own to lead them and speak out for them. The good lord has been gracious too. He has protected us from all evil and enabled us to survive unimaginable humiliation and harassment. God has given us the strength to offer ourselves to our people, so that we can be of service to them. In this manifesto, fellow countrymen and women, you will find our diagnosis and solutions to the challenges that face our country today. Among the challenges is the need to restore human dignity, to place respect of human rights at the fore of all our policies and programmes. We have, therefore, developed policies and programmes designed to restore human dignity through employment creation and provision of essential infrastructure and services. Give us the mandate to preside over the affairs of our country. We shall deal with its problems squarely and with due diligence. We shall not waste a second on fruitless vengeance, as has been the custom. For us, vengeance is for God. We are ready to serve our people and our country with diligence and zeal. We shall reduce taxes to resuscitate our economy, manage the exchange rate responsibly and with employment creation and growing our economy in mind. Our economic policies will create jobs and allow individuals and families to rebuild their lives and dignity. My fellow citizens, we can create a new social order in our land. Zambians can again have a future to look forward to. We can have a new country in which people look out and support one another. Give us your vote, and we shall change Zambia for the better. We have a competent team to manage the affairs of our country. Our candidates in the elections will be selected by the local people in all the wards and constituencies throughout Zambia. Our season of service is nigh and we look forward to being of service to you all.

Michael C. Sata
PRESIDENT

March 10, 2011 at 16:17 Leave a comment

MMD Manifesto 2007 Zambia

To see the full document, please click MMD 2007 Manifesto Zambia to open a pdf-file.

MMD Manifesto 2007 (from the original document)

New Deal

“Party of Choice”

Strong on the Economy, Social Responsible, Strong and Decisive Political Leadership

MMD MANIFESTO 2007 – 2011

“For Growth and Empowerment”

MMD MANIFESTO 2007 – 2011

“The Hour Has Come”

MMD

“Growth and Empowerment”

CONTENTS … PAGE

ABBREVENTIONS … v
1. MANIFESTO KEYNOTE: FROM GROWTH TO EMPOWEREMENT … l
2. MMD, OUR POLITICAL PARTY … 4
3. ECONOMIC POLICY AND OBJECTIVES … 6
4. MACROECONOMIC PROGRAMMES … 8
5. SECTORAL ECONOMIC PROGRAMMES .. 13
6. SOCIAL ECONOMIC PROGRAMMES … 25
7. SOCIAL DELIVERY SYSTEMS … 33
8. DEMOCRACY AND GOVERNANCE … 52
9. JUSTICE … 58
10. INFORMATION AND BROADCASTING … 62
11. HOME AFFAIRS … 64
12. DEFENCE AND SECURITY … 66
13. FOREIGN AFFAIRS … 68

MANIFESTO KEYNOTE: FROM GROWTH TO EMPOWEREMENT

Fellow countrymen and women, We, the Zambian people, have once again been presented with an opportunity and a conducive environtnent to exercise our democratic right- the right to vote for representatives and a government of our choice during the 2006 Presidential and General Elections. Indeed this is a moment of serious reflection on the events of the past five years and to critically evaluate the performance of our representatives and the government we elected in power. A time to take stock of how all of us in the political arena delivered on our respective mandates during the past five years. This is also the time for us to once again, renew our social contract between the MMD our Party and the Electorate. Every political party, big or small, will go all out to give promises, compete and attract the attention of Zambians to support andvote for their respective candidates. As we commit ourselves to the election process therefore, it is essential to summon all our experiences in all spheres of our lives during the past five years in order to be able to make a conscious and informed decision on which political Pasty to vote for. A political Party that will not only inspire hope but also posses the capacity to deliver on your expectations and aspirations. This is the fourth time that, our Party, the MMD is seeking your support and vote. We trust that you the Zambian voters will once again make a carefull analysis of the performance of the MMD New Deal Government policies during the past five years through this Manifesto. We also trust that you will be able to carefully analyze, the Manifestos of other competing political Parties and compare with that of the MMD New Deal Government in order to make an informed choice. In this process, we as the MMD New Deal Government remain convinced that the Zambian people will once again exercise their democratic right to vote for a leadership based on, among other tenets, integrity, capacity and the ability of that leadership to deliver on their promises. We are equally convinced that the Zambian people will vote for a leadership with the necessary experience, stability and vision that will guarantee and ensure a secure future for all Zambians and their children. Over the past five years the MMD New Deal Government pursued Macro economic policies aimed at arresting economic decline, stabilizing the economy and further entrenching a liberal economic environment. The prudent management of the economy has regained the country the necessary investor confidence and has generated both domestic and foreign interest in the economy.
Growth and development are now taking root in the Zambian economy. For example, the achievement of Highly Indebted Poor Countries (HIPC) completion point has led to a great reduction in debt burden of the countly. This state of affairs has freed resources to various sectors of the econonly that will facilitate investment and growth and improve the living standards of the Zambian people. The improvements in the foreign exchange market that has led to the strengthening of the Kwacha against other major currencies such as the United States Dollar has put the Zambian economy in better stead for the Zambian entrepreneurship to invest in capital goods and improve their profitability and business in general. In addition, the declining inflation and interest rates are impacting positively on the cost of living and investment portfolios of the Zambian people. The development efforts embarked upon have ensured positive performance in most areas of the economy such as commerce and industry, tourism, mining and agriculture. The strengthening industrial base and the continued prudent management of social and cultural sectors, including good governance, have placed our country on the path to sustained growth and development. We the MMD New Deal Government therefore, commit ourselves to building on these successes by focusing on policy formulation and facilitation of effective implementation of policies and strategies to ensure prompt delively of goods and services with a view to einpowering the people of Zambia. The MMD New Deal Government has rekindled hope and confidence in the Zambian economy and restored pride in most Zambians as a people capable of competing favourably in the global market. We are determined to sustain this confidence in the economy and to maintain growth and development.  In this Manifesto, the MMD New Deal Government has given account of its performance in the past five years and has stipulated the objectives aimed at addressing various issues of concern to Zambians beyond 2006. The experience of our Party in government and the successful implementation of most of our policies intended to respond to the wishes and desires of the Zambian people including the articulation of our agenda for the country beyond 2006 cannot be matched by any political Party in the country today. In the continued fight against poverty and unemployment the MMD New Deal Government, will continue to rely and encourage the private sector to take the lead in economic activity and growth. We shall equally rededicate ourselves to empowering Zambians so that they may realize their full potential and fully benefit from the wealth of their country. As a concerned Party for the Zambian population, the MMD New Deal Government will also continue to fight HIV and AIDS scourge with the support and full involvement of all the people concerned in our land. The Manifesto we are putting before you therefore has been formulated to demonstrate the above commitments through a detailed elaboration. It is our hope that we shall convince you, as the voter, to give us another mandate to provide leadership to this great country as we undertake the task to continue maintaining the country’s economy on the growth and development path to the benefit of all Zambians. The MMD New Deal Government will truthfully, diligently and dutifully pursue the objectives in all the areas as detailed in this Manifesto. Fellow country men and women, your vote is very important and we trust and believe that you will vote wisely and intelligently by ensuring that you vote for a Party that will further the growth and development of our country, Zambia. That Party is the MMD under the New Deal Administration.  I take this opportunity to urge you fellow Zambians to vote for, me, Levy Patrick Mwanawasa, SC as your Presidential candidate and for the other MMD candidates in the 2006 Presidential, Parliamentary and Local Government Elections. There is no other alternative but the MMD New Deal Government.  Let us all unite and prosper together.

Levy Patrick Mwanawasa, SC PRESIDENT

November 2, 2010 at 15:14 Leave a comment


about the blog

This blog is about countries of the Southern African Development Community (SADC) regarding societies, political parties and policies. Most interest will be spent on the countries: Botswana, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa and Zambia.

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