Posts tagged ‘1999’

DTA 1999 Manifesto Namibia

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DTA OF NAMIBIA ELECTION MANIFESTO 1999 (from the Original document)

INTRODUCTION

Over the past ten years since Namibia achieved its Independence, certain national functions have become burning issues almost our people.
As a result of the continued neglect and deterioration of these functions, namely Education, Health Care and Social Services, the redistribution of land and resettlement of the landless, and the country’s economy, the DTA of Namibia decided to discuss ways and means of improving on the present government’s track record of our party were to be elected in the coming National Assembly and Presidential elections.
What follows is the result of the deliberations on these topics at a Congress of the DTA of Namibia held in Windhoek at the beginning of June 1999.
This is the party’s policy on Education, Health and Social Services, Land and Resettlement and the Economy.
the party’s policy regarding all the other government functions remain unchanged and may be obtained from the party’s Head Office, situated at 28 Trift Street, Windhoek, telephone 238530.

July 2, 2012 at 22:15 Leave a comment

Frelimo 1999 Manifesto Mozambique

Please click Frelimo Manifesto 1999 to see the full version of the document as a pdf-file.

MANIFESTO ELEITORAL (from the Original document)

FRELIMO 1999
JUNTOS POR UM FUTURO MELHOR
PARTIDO FRELIMO
MANIFESTO ELEITORAL

INDICE … Pagina
1. Juntos pela Consolidacao da Paz, Democracia e Unidade Nacional … 2
2. Juntos pela JusticaS ocial e Solidariedade Nacional … 4
3. Juntos pela Estabilidade el Desenvolvimento Economico … 11
4. Juntos pela Conservacao do Meio Ambiente … 17
5. Juntos por uma Administracao Publica Moderna … 17
6. Juntos pela Paz, Cooperaca Solidariedade e Amizade no Mundo … 19

JUNTOS POR UM FUTURO MELHOR
1. Juntos pela Consolidacao da Paz, Democracia e Unidade Nacional
Mocambicanas,
Mocambicanos,
Patriotas,
No nosso pais a consolidacao da Paz 6 ja uma realidade.
Fortalece-se a estabilidade politics.
O desenvolvimento economico e social prossegue num ritmo intenso.
Reforca-se a liberdade e a defesa dos direitos dos cidadaos.
O pais inteiro regozija-se pelos resultados alcancados pela FRELIMO, no cumprimento dos compromissos assumidos, em 1994, quando recebeu do povo o mandato de conduzir os destinos do Pais.
Desde entao, empenhamo-nos arduamente na reabilitacao da economia e do tecido social, profunmente, afectados pela guerra em todo pais.
Importa agora consolidar as conquista alcancadas para juntos encararmos os desafios do novo milenio.
No decurso dos ultimos cinco anos, em tranquilidade e sossego, juntos reconstruimos, sobre os escombros da guerra, o nosso belo Mocambique, depois de muitos anos de sofrimento, de mortes e de destruicoes, perpetradas pelos inimigos da demoecracia e da independencia nacional.
No passado e em torno da FRELIMO, juntos engajamos-nos na missiao de libertar a terra e os homens.
Hoje, fortalecemos unidos o nosso empenho na consolidacao da paz e na construcao do bem estar do povo mocambicano.
O caminho a percorrer e sinda longo.
Alenta-nos, porem, a confianca e firmeza com que unidos encaramos o nosso futuro.
Ao longo da sua historia, a FRELIMO valorizou sempre o principio da Unidade National, como arma fundamental de luta para atingir os objectivos definidos em cada fase.
Este principio ganha, hoje, uma importancia cada vez maior, na criacao de uma cultura de paz, de justica social, de igualdade e de solidariedade em toda a familia mocambicana.
Mocambicanas,
Mocambicanos,
Patriotas.

April 18, 2012 at 18:12 Leave a comment

BNF 1999 Manifesto Botswana

Please click on BNF 1999 Manifesto Botswana to open the full versin of the document as pdf-file.

BOTSWANA NATIONAL FRONT (from the Original document)

1999 MANIFESTO

WORKING TOGETHER FOR SUCCESS

TABLE OF CONTENTS … PAGES

Foreword … 1
Preamble … 5

CHAPTER

1. Unity of the Nation … 5
2. Governance … 6
3. Decentralisation and Development … 8
4. Economy … 8
5. Education and Training … 11
6. Social Security and Welfare … 13
7. Health … 13
8. Housing … 14
9. Environment and Tourism … 15
10. Gender … 17
11. Labour Issues … 18
12. Civil Society … 19
13. Agriculture … 21
14. Water Development … 22
15. Mining and Mineral Resources … 22
16. Prison Service … 23
17. Police Force … 23
18. Corruption and Accountability … 23
19. Defence and Security … 24
20. International Relations … 24
21. Sports and Recreation … 25

FOREWORD

The 1999 Election is the eighth in Botswana since 1965. This election represents several years of experience for our nation and the Botswana National Front (BNF). The election also signals the end of an era. This is an election that takes us as a nation, through the last few months of the 1990’s decade which in fact, also marks the end of the 20th century. Since the mid-1960’s Botswana has seen three decades of uninterrupted one party rule of the Botswana Democratic Party (BDP). It is up to us as a nation to judge the achievements and failures of the present government but I wish to point out the following simply to help you take stock of things and make your decision on who to vote for, in a proper perspective.  Three decades of post-colonialism in Africa have been turbulent and generally disastrous in terms of development, human rights, institutional development, economic growth and environmental protection. As well as the inequitable distributions of the national resources resulting in the division of the population into the high percentage of the extremely poor and the small percentage of the extremely rich. The resultant situation is growth in poverty, unemployment, the collapse of the agricultural sector, constant military and police intervention to silence the poor, phenomenal growth in unemployment and poverty resulting in crime and corruption, ethnic strife, growth in refugee population and above all political bankruptcy and corruption of unparalleled magnitude.  Today, in Botswana we have large numbers of doctors, university lecturers, accountants, engineers, architects, quantity surveyors, etc, from Tanzania, Sudan, Ghana, and of course China. These countries have been able to equip their rationales with the necessary skill to fill up posts which should have been filled by the locals. In Botswana, how many citizen doctors, health inspectors, architects, engineers, etc, do we have after 33 years? The BDP government has been able to lay down the basic social and physical infrastructure in terms of roads, schools, clinics, water supply and telecommunications. I believe as a nation we all know and appreciate this. The laying down of infrastructure is considered, throughout the world, as the basic need and requirement for all countries. Many countries in the world including much poorer ones in Africa have managed to build schools, health facilities, universities, telecommunications and provided water and housing for much larger population than ours have performed in the area of infrastructural development over the past three decades of independence). The BDP government has failed in three decades to take this country beyond infrastructural development hence:
1. Poverty remains deeply entrenched in our people’s daily existence. The number of households living under conditions of absolute poverty is 55% of the rural population, 46% of Peri-Urban Village Population and 29% of Urban population. (BIDPA 1997)
2. Unemployment has remained above 20% of the labour force since 1989. Among the youth unemployment ranges between 30 and 40%. For women it is estimated at 29% (CSO, 1992, UNICEF, 1993). The 1995 / 1996 Botswana Labour Force Survey (BLFS) puts the unemployment rate at 35%, the hardest hit are Youth aged between 20 and 24 at 39%.
3. Agriculture has collapsed not largely because of drought but because of the lack of proper planning. At present the government spends millions of Pula on drought relief in an apparent attempt to help the people. But there is neither assurance to farmers, the unemployed, female headed households, the people in the most disadvantaged regions of the country that this assistance will continue or that BDP government will come up with something better for the future.
4. Inflation remains high and beyond control by BDP government because of high economic dependence on imports of most essential goods especially foodstuff. Between 1989 and now the inflation rate ranged between 10% and 17.7% (Botswana Government 1993).
5. The rapid increase in corruption especially among people holding high office, has resulted in the emulation of leaders by the ordinary people. Corruption, abuse of power and arrogance by the BDP leadership have grown and many millions of Pula have been lost at BHC, NDB, BCB, BBS, BAMB and Government ministries and departments. While denying these the Government has come up with the so-called “Economic Crime Act or Corruption Law”. Why since they deny that they are corrupt?
6. Consultation has become a mockery under the BDP rule. Laws are prepared and passed in a rush without consultation, even with the BDP backbenchers. The following are a few examples : Incomes Policy (1990), Agricultural Policy (1991), Wildlife Policy (1993), Tribal Land Amendment Act (1993), Amendment of the Abortion Law (1993), Corruption Act (1994) and the Kanye incident where the chief was replaced with his son without first consulting the community.
7. The BDP government dismissed over 50000 workers and reemployed some as civil servants to silence them or to prevent them from striking.
9. The rapid increase in juvenile delinquency with the effect that when a delinquent youth becomes an adult, we have a phenomenon of delinquent children becoming parents which gradually gives rise to a delinquent nation. Thus giving rise to a vicious cycle which threatens to engulf the whole nation.
10. The acute shortage of houses and the short-sighted view of the government of the Botswana Democratic Party which considers the housing of the nation as a commodity to be enjoyed by the well to do, who have the financial power to buy and sell.  This same government wants to be returned to power when they offer no new ideas about creating a hly democratic system of government, creating more economic opportunities, providing markets for our enterprising entrepreneurs and providing better assistance to the needy and disabled and providing a comprehensive social security for the nation.
The BNF has in this Manifesto a clear strategy to:
a) Empower citizens.
b) Eradicate poverty.
c) Create more employment opportunities.
d) Combat AIDS.
e) Combat corruption.
f) Develop quality human resource base.
g) Diversify the economy.
h) Provide a comprehensive social security.
i) Create a truly democratic society of equals regardless of ethnicity gender, language, religion and race.
10. The 1999 general elections offers Batswana another opportunity to make Botswana of the 21st century and happy place to live in by voting for the BNF.  The present trend contains a time bomb and social strife that as a small and young nation we cannot afford.

11. The traditional BDP policies constitute a time bomb which the nation cannot afford.
We can avoid this by voting for the BNF.

“Vote BNF! VOTE FOR A BETTER LIFE!”

TOGETHER WE CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE

DR. KENNETH G.S. KOMA
PRESIDENT BNF

KOPANO! KOPANO! KOPANO!

December 19, 2011 at 22:13 Leave a comment

BCP 1999 Manifesto Botswana

Please click on BCP 1999 Manifesto Botswana  to download the full version of the manifesto as pdf-file.

BOTSWANA CONGRESS PARTY BCP (from the Original document)

MANIFESTO 1999

BCP – New Party for New Millennium

CONTENTS … PAGE

Foreword … 3
Introduction … 4
1.0 The Vision … 7
1.1 Mission Statement … 7
1.2 Objectives of the BCP … 7
1.3 Self-respecting Citizens … 7
1.4 A hard working and prosperous People … 8
1.5 A morally responsible nation … 9

SECTION II: BCP ON POLITICS AND GOVERNANCE

2.0 Democracy … 11
3.0 Foreign Policy … 12
4.0 Defence Policy … 13

SECTION III: BCP ON ECONOMIC ISSUES

5.0 The Economic Strategy … 15
5.1 Foreign Investment and Aid … 17
6.0 Rural Development … 17
7.0 Land Policy … 18
8.0 Agriculture and Food Strategy … 19
9.0 Environment: Protecting the Base and Ensuring Sustainability … 20
10.0 Water Policy … 21
11.0 Labour Relations … 22

SECTION IV: BCP ON SOCIAL ISSUES

12.0 Education with Production … 23

13.0 Religious Policy … 26
14.0 Health … 27
15.0 HIV / AIDS … 27
16.0 Social Security and Welfare … 28
17.0 Housing … 31
18.0 Gender … 32
19.0 Youth Development … 33
20.0 Arts and Culture … 34
21.0 Sports and Recreation … 35
22.0 Conclusion … 36

M.K. Dingake Parliamentary Candidate President – BCP

BOTSWANA CONGRESS PARTY (BCP) MANIFESTO 1999

Guaranteeing a better future for all

Foreword

The Botswana Congress Party is presenting its manifesto to the nation for the first time. This manifesto is but a summary of the problems, issues and challenges which face our nation on the eve of the new millennium. As a party with a difference in quality, style and truthfulness to the needs of our people we have carefully identified these issues and required policy action and programmes. We call on Batswana to take us on the basis of what we pledge in this manifesto. The policies and programmes contained in this manifesto show our deep concern about the problems which face our young people, women, the workers, parents, employers, business owners and the non- governmental sector. I am pleased to say with confidence that as a responsible political party we are not only concerned but determined to address the problems of underdevelopment which still afflict our people. I call on Batswana to give us the mandate to rule. It is only with that mandate that we shall show the fallacy of the BDP’s irresponsible claim that problems of poverty, unemployment, school leaver, low productivity, etc. are worldwide and therefore cannot be solved by the government.

I thank you.

Michael K. Dingake May, 1999

Vote for BCP!
Vote for Meaningful Change!
Vote to guarantee a better future for yourself and your family members!
Introduction

This year, 1999 marks the eighth Botswana election since the first one was held in 1965. In the past seven elections Batswana voted for the Botswana Democratic Party (BDP) in large numbers. They entrusted their lives with the BDP government which promised them more jobs, better education and training, elimination of inherited poverty and inequality. The BDP further promised to bring justice where oppression and injustice were widespread, improve the health and economic conditions of Batswana and transform Botswana from an underdeveloped country status to a rapidly industrializing one. It is now more than three decades of BDP rule.

Next year is the year 3-000 which will mark the beginning of a new millennium.

The questions that each Motswana both as an individual and as a father, a mother, a parent, a young man / woman and a child must ask themselves are:

a) What is my future and that of my family?

b) Do I see any improvement in my life and that of members of my family?

c) If there is any improvement is it sustainable? What future do I have?

It is difficult to imagine a guaranteed future when there is:

– over 30% unemployment.

– over 40% household poverty,

– when Gini coefficient show inequality of over 60%,

– when crime and corruption have become uncontrollable and those who rule the country are part of it,

– How can you be sure that your house, your cow, your field, your car, etc., will still be yours five years from now when ownership of property is increasingly going to the few wealthy families?

The ruling Botswana Democratic Party has failed to develop Botswana. The country remains both economically and democratically underdeveloped. Poverty, inequality and exploitation under the BDP is rampant and chronic. The future strategies of the BDP as outlined in the National Development Plan 8 and vision 2016 are bound to perpetuate, entrench and increase poverty and misery of Batswana.

Why is the BDP government failing?

– First because from the start the BDP strategies were never intended to benefit the majority of Batswana but enrich the few chosen ones in the party ranks;
– Second because the main strategy is false. It is a strategy based on the unrealistic and naive believe that by mimicking what developed western countries did centuries ago Botswana will develop.
– This catch-up approach alienates Batswana from taking the responsibility of developing their country.

Instead the leaders of Botswana are running all over the world looking for those with money and experience of development. The sad thing is that none are found. This strategy is both naive and promises a lot of jobs, education, health, houses, but in reality delivers wealth to a few and poverty, unemployment and servitude for the majority. Thirdly, the BDP economic policies are elitist in that policy formulation does not involve the disempowered and marginalised, precisely because the BDP does not believe the people have anything to offer.

The Botswana Congress Party – the liberator of our nation!

This first Manifesto of the BCP tells you how you can best ensure your future by voting for the BCP.

November 19, 2011 at 21:55 Leave a comment

BDP 1999 Manifesto Botswana

Please click BDP 1999 Manifesto Botswana to open the full document as odf-file.

Botswana Democratic Party 1999 Manifesto

A Millennium for Opportunities

Festus Gontebanye Mogae (P.H, M.C.C., MP) PARTY PRESIDENT

FOREWORD

The BDP’s message to Batswana for the 1999 elections is “Take advantage of the opportunities offered by BDP in the coming millennium.” Together we will make Botswana a country to be proud of. Let us collectively create a life of self- reliance as opposed to a dependency syndrome ‘Mokodua go tsosiwa o o itsosang’. We have come a long way over the past 33 years in terms of economic and social developments. In this our 1999Manifesto, we creatively and deliberately open a vista of opportunities geared towards enhancing the quality of life of all Batswana.  Emphasis is on empowerment of Batswana, to enable them to participate meaningfully in every aspect of our economy. Our aim is to involve all stakeholders in substantially reducing current levels of poverty and unemployment with the long-term objective of eradicating poverty.  The BDP will continue to provide the necessary leadership, policy, and strategies to achieve these objectives.  Social equity and justice will be essential considerations as we craft policies and programmes. Issues of balance, pertaining to vulnerable groups, gender, ethnicity, geographical location, languages and other imbalances will feature prominently on our development agenda. Furthermore, we will pay special attention to the development of a strong civil society, laying emphasis on population dynamics and human development. The BDP will continue to pursue new strategies to mitigate the effects of HIV / AIDS and arrest the spread of the virus. The opposition has spent the last 5 years perfecting their skills in opposing everything the BDP has done without offering alternatives. What is even more disturbing is that in the process, they have also excelled in their resort to intolerance and abuse. They have failed dismally to offer Batswana a viable alternative. Since the formation of the BDP in 1962, we have provided capable visionary leadership, first to the membership of the party, and in the running of the affairs of the country. The party has remained one solid and united force under the leadership of Sir Seretse Khama, followed by Sir Ketumile Masire, and now, under my leadership. We cannot afford to enter the new millennium with uncertainty. Now would be the worst possible moment to try out any of the alternative opposition parties. Vote BDP and be guaranteed peace and stability, dignity, human rights, prosperity and equality before the law.

PRESIDENT OF THE BDP

TABLE OF CONTENTS
CHAPTER … PAGES
Foreword … 1
Table of contents … 2
1994 Manifesto Promises and deliveries:
1. The Economy … 6
2. Poverty and Unemployment … 6
3. Social Services and Physical Infrastructure … 7
4. Private Sector and Economic Development … 8
5. Labour Relations … 10
6. Public Sector … 11
7. Education and Training … 12
8. Agriculture … 13
9. Gender Equity … 14
10. Youth … 15
11. Sport, Recreation and Culture … 16
12. Vulnerable Groups … 18
13. Democracy and Civil Society … 18
14. HIV / AIDS … 19
15. Defence and Security … 20
16. International Relations … 20
17. Conclusion … 21

September 1, 2011 at 21:14 Leave a comment

BCP Manifesto 1999 Botswana

To see the full version, please click BCP 1999 Manifesto Botswana to open a pdf-file.

BOTSWANA CONGRESS PARTY BCP

MANIFESTO 1999

BCP – New Party for New Millennium

CONTENTS … PAGE

Foreword … 3
Introduction … 4
1.0 The Vision … 7
1.1 Mission Statement … 7
1.2 Objectives of the BCP … 7
1.3 Self-respecting Citizens … 7
1.4 A hard working and prosperous People … 8
1.5 A morally responsible nation … 9

SECTION II: BCP ON POLITICS AND GOVERNANCE

2.0 Democracy … 11
3.0 Foreign Policy … 12
4.0 Defence Policy … 13

SECTION III: BCP ON ECONOMIC ISSUES

5.0 The Economic Strategy … 15
5.1 Foreign Investment and Aid … 17
6.0 Rural Development … 17
7.0 Land Policy … 18
8.0 Agriculture and Food Strategy … 19
9.0 Environment: Protecting the Base and Ensuring Sustainability … 20
10.0 Water Policy … 21
11.0 Labour Relations … 22

SECTION IV: BCP ON SOCIAL ISSUES

12.0 Education with Production … 23

13.0 Religious Policy … 26
14.0 Health … 27
15.0 HIV / AIDS … 27
16.0 Social Security and Welfare … 28
17.0 Housing … 31
18.0 Gender … 32
19.0 Youth Development … 33
20.0 Arts and Culture … 34
21.0 Sports and Recreation … 35
22.0 Conclusion … 36

M.K. Dingake Parliamentary Candidate President – BCP

BOTSWANA CONGRESS PARTY (BCP) MANIFESTO 1999

Guaranteeing a better future for all

Foreword

The Botswana Congress Party is presenting its manifesto to the nation for the first time.

This manifesto is but a summary of the problems, issues and challenges which face our nation on the eve of the new millennium.

As a party with a difference in quality, style and truthfulness to the needs of our people we have carefully identified these issues and required policy action and programmes.

We call on Batswana to take us on the basis of what we pledge in this manifesto.

The policies and programmes contained in this manifesto show our deep concern about the problems which face our young people, women, the workers, parents, employers, business owners and the non- governmental sector.

I am pleased to say with confidence that as a responsible political party we are not only concerned but determined to address the problems of underdevelopment which still afflict our people.

I call on Batswana to give us the mandate to rule.

It is only with that mandate that we shall show the fallacy of the BDP’s irresponsible claim that problems of poverty, unemployment, school leaver, low productivity, etc. are worldwide and therefore cannot be solved by the government.

I thank you.

Michael K. Dingake May, 1999

Vote for BCP!
Vote for Meaningful Change!
Vote to guarantee a better future for yourself and your family members!

June 4, 2011 at 19:24 Leave a comment

UDF Manifesto 1999 Malawi

To see the full version of the document, please click UDF 1999 Manifesto Malawi to open a pdf-file.

Eradicating Poverty

Our Goal

Manifesto of the United Democratic Front 1999 (from the Original document)

Contents … Page

Message from H E Dr Bakili Muluzi … 5
1 Guaranteeing Food Security … 8
2 Delivering Universal Health Care … 14
3 Advancing Quality Education … 18
4 Ensuring Economic Prosperity … 24
5 Devolving Power to the Community … 38
6 Creating Opportunities for Employment … 42
7 Investing in Infrastructure … 47
8 Empowering Women … 56
9 Harnessing the Potential of our Youth … 62
10 Increasing Social welfare … 66
11 Protecting our Environment … 70
12 Fighting Crime … 76
13 Providing Efficient Public Service … 86
14 Consolidating our Freedom and Democracy … 86
15 Promoting Diversity and Culture … 90
16 Establishing a Secure Malawi in the World … 94
Why vote UDF? … 100

Personal Message from His Excellency Dr Bakili Muluzi State President of the Republic of Malawi

My Dear Fellow Malawians,

Five years ago you gave a mandate to the United Democratic Front to govern this country and safeguard the hard-won democracy and freedoms that had been denied to you for a very long time. On behalf of the UDF Government I thank you all for the trust and support you have given us these past five years.  The challenges accompanying his mandate were enormous. Malawians had struggled for democracy, but that democracy was a means to an end rather than an end in itself. The UDF set about its noble task on the conviction that democratic governance was a tool with which to achieve the economic, social, and cultural aspiration which, because of the oppressive rule of the MCP regime, had eluded this country for 31 long years. Determined to respond to the high and legitimate expectations of the people, and in line with our 1994 campaign pledges, we decided to make poverty alleviation priority number one in all our development policies. We defined poverty alleviation as the equitable provision of the basic necessities of everyday life, such as water, food, health services, education and infrastructure. We also understood poverty alleviation to include the raising of national productivity through sustainable, broad-based economic development. We sought to transform the nation’s economic structures to ensure that they meaningfully contribute towards the raising of living standards and enhance the participation of the majority in development activities. Time and again I have stated the truism that democracy in itself does not fill the stomach. To overcome the problem of food shortages often brought about in Malawi by insufficient or excessive rains, my Government took various initiatives detailed in this manifesto, including the highly successful Starter Pack Scheme, a long-overdue programme to promote irrigation, and the encouragement of farmers to grow drought resistant crops such as cassava, potatoes, and millet to supplement maize.  My Fellow Malawians, it is not enough that wealth should be created in a country: it should also be shared fairly. It is a form of abominable greed for anyone to make himself a millionaire by obstructing other people from participating in business or farming, as was the case with the MCP regime, with this view in mind my Government has liberalised the growing of tobacco, Malawi’s most profitable cash crop. Recently 20,000 smallholder burly tobacco growers took their produce to the market and returned with pockets bulging with bank notes. This is economic democracy, a sharing in the wealth of the country. The tobacco income that was monopolised by a few in the past is now shared by many. The UDF government recognised the need for both economic growth and bask needs programmes. We defined basic needs programmes as those that aim at reversing worsening social indicators, such as schools and health centres, which also have long term benefit. In 1995, in collaboration with the World-Bank we set up he now famous Malawi Social Action Fund (MASF) as the delivery vehicle for reaching out to the masses and promoting the spirit of self-help. Through MASAF the people were empowered, and they built schools, health centres, roads, bridges and boreholes, and implemented afforestation projects to save the environment. A total of US$56 million was used to finance these projects, which were identified by the people themselves and to which communities also contributed through their own self-help efforts. It had been previously planned that MASAF One would run for five years, but so high was the demand for MASAF support, and so popular the programme, that the resources were utilised within two years of implementation. The World Bank demonstrated its confidence in the new Malawi by providing further funding for MASAF Two, at a total cost of US$68 million, which as well as continuing with the activities of MASAF One, also includes a component for the urban poor. MASAF has been a remarkable achievement, not only for the facilities it has provided, but also for the training in new skills that it has offered to the people. Ordinary people have been trained in project implementation, management, basic book-keeping, and road construction, among many other skills. MASAF has been so successful and such a true example of bottom-to-top democracy, that neighbouring countries have sent delegations to study how it works. Two new ideas born in Malawi, namely MASAF and Starter Pack, are well on their way to being emulated by other countries. This is a source of pride for Malawians. Under economic growth programmes we included those initiatives aimed at stimulating economic growth at both household and national levels, such as increased credit, mobilisation of rural savings and small-scale business. To achieve these objectives we undertook a number of credit operations through institutions such as Small Enterprise Development Organisation of Malawi (SEDOM), National Association of Business Women (NABW), Development of Malawian Traders Trust (DEMATT), Womens World Banking (WWB), Malawi Rural finance Company (MRFC), Investment and Development Bank of Malawi (INDEBANK) and the National Economic Council (NEC) through its Social Dimensions of Adjustment Project initiatives. We set up a Small and Medium Enterprise Fund (SMEF) in 1995 to give credit to the poor so as to economically empower them. We also set up the Malawi Mudzi Financial Services Project to assist farmers and small-scale businessmen and women. We launched the Youth Credit Scheme in order to assist eligible youth to establish small-scale businesses. We initiated and implemented agricultural and economic reform programmes aimed at increasing productivity and promoting wider participation in the economy. We introduced free primary education so that even the most needy child could go to school. We removed constraints to business and created an environment conducive to domestic as well as foreign investment. All our programmes have been received with great enthusiasm by all the people and our efforts have paid off. Our programmes have not saved all our problems caused by three decades of MCP mismanagement, but we have laid the foundation for a vibrant culture of self-reliance. After 31 years of dictatorial rule, the people of Malawi have these past years seen a different kind of government that cares for the people and responds to their needs and aspirations. Furthermore, the people of Malawi entrusted the UDF with the mandate of safeguarding our hard-won freedoms and democratic values. Not only have these values been guarded most jealously, they have been consolidated and been allowed to fully blossom under UDF rule. I am proud to say that during the five years of UDF rule not a single person has been detained, imprisoned, become “meat for crocodiles”, or forced into exile, for merely criticising the Government. Compare this to the MCP regime when the mere suspicion of harbouring a dissident thought, and even drinking tea on Martyrs’ Day, was enough to land one in detention.  No one has been punished or threatened for openly cherishing an ambition for high office. Compare this to the MCP regime when senior cabinet ministers were brutally murdered at Mwanza for merely questioning the policies of the dictatorial regime. Democracy and freedom have been safe and sound under UDF rule, which is only natural because the UDF, being one of the parties that fought for democracy, is better qualified to safeguard it than the MCP which fought tooth and pail against democracy.

April 30, 2011 at 20:26 Leave a comment

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This blog is about countries of the Southern African Development Community (SADC) regarding societies, political parties and policies. Most interest will be spent on the countries: Botswana, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa and Zambia.

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